Fighting The Gossip



What is the significance of Blake Lively's stance with Penn Badgley according to OK Weekly Magazine's body language expert, Patti Wood. What is the latest gossip? Find out at the link!

http://www.scribd.com/doc/34273552/OK-BlakePenn

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Red Carpet Vs. Real Life


Cosmopolitan's body language expert, Patti Wood, exposes which Red Carpet celebs are putting on a show when they pose for pictures and which are genuine. Can you guess the real from the fake? The answers are at the link!

http://www.scribd.com/doc/34851930/Cosmopolitan-RedCarpetVsRealLife

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Body Language and Eye Contact, What kind does your eye contact say?

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://PattiWood.net. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

High-Testosterone People Feel Rewarded By Others' Anger

High-Testosterone People Feel Rewarded By Others' Anger, New Study Finds
ScienceDaily (May 12, 2007) — Most people don't appreciate an angry look, but a new University of Michigan psychology study found that some people find angry expressions so rewarding that they will readily learn ways to encourage them.


•"It's kind of striking that an angry facial expression is consciously valued as a very negative signal by almost everyone, yet at a non-conscious level can be like a tasty morsel that some people will vigorously work for," said Oliver Schultheiss, co-author of the study and a U-M associate professor of psychology.

The findings may explain why some people like to tease each other so much, he added. "Perhaps teasers are reinforced by that fleeting 'annoyed look' on someone else's face and therefore will continue to heckle that person to get that look again and again," he said. "As long as it does not stay there for long, it's not perceived as a threat, but as a reward."

The researchers took saliva samples from participants to measure testosterone, a hormone that has been associated with dominance motivation.

Participants then worked on a "learning task" in which one complex sequence of keypresses was followed by an angry face on the screen, another sequence was followed by a neutral face, and a third sequence was followed by no face.

Participants who were high in testosterone relative to other members of their sex learned the sequence that was followed by an angry face better than the other sequences, while participants low in testosterone did not show this learning advantage for sequences that were reinforced by an angry face.

Notably, this effect emerged more strongly in response to faces that were presented subliminally, that is, too fast to allow conscious identification. Perhaps just as noteworthy, participants were not aware of the patterns in the sequences of keypresses as they learned them.

While high-testosterone participants showed better learning in response to anger faces, they were unaware of the fact that they learned anything in the first place and unaware of what kind of faces had reinforced their learning.

Michelle Wirth, the lead author of the study and now a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, added: "Better learning of a task associated with anger faces indicates that the anger faces were rewarding, as in a rat that learns to press a lever in order to receive a tasty treat. In that sense, anger faces seemed to be rewarding for high-testosterone people, but aversive for low-testosterone people."
She said the findings contribute to a body of research suggesting that perceived emotional facial expressions are important signals to help guide human behavior, even if people are not aware that they do so.

"The human brain may have built-in mechanisms to detect and respond to emotions perceived in others," she said. "However, what an emotional facial expression, such as anger, 'means' to a given individual—whether it is something to pursue or avoid, for example—can vary."

U-M psychology researchers Michelle Wirth and Schultheiss, the authors of the study, published their findings in the journal Physiology and Behavior.




Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://PattiWood.net. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Do Angry Men Get More Attention? Anger And First Impressions

Do Angry Men Get Noticed?
Science Daily (June 7, 2006) — By comparing how quickly human facial expressions of different types are detected in a crowd of neutral faces, researchers have demonstrated that male angry faces are a priority for visual processing -- particularly for male observers. The findings are reported by Mark Williams of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Jason Mattingley of the University of Melbourne, Australia, and appear in the June 6th issue of Current Biology.

In evolutionary terms, it makes sense that our attention is attracted by threat in the environment. It has long been hypothesized that facial expressions that signal potential threat, such as anger, may capture attention and therefore "stand out" in a crowd. In fact, there are specific brain regions that are dedicated to processing threatening facial expressions. Given the many differences between males and females, with males being larger and more physically aggressive than females, one might also suspect differences in the way in which threat is detected from individuals of different genders.

In the new work, Williams and Mattingley show that angry male faces are found more rapidly than angry female faces by both men and women. In addition, men find angry faces of both genders faster than women, whereas women find socially relevant expressions (for example, happy or sad) more rapidly. The work suggests that although males are biased toward detecting threatening faces, and females are more attuned to socially relevant expressions, both sexes prioritize the detection of angry male faces; in short, angry men get noticed. The advantage for detecting angry male faces is consistent with the notion that human perceptual processes have been shaped by evolutionary pressures arising from the social environment.

Reference: Mark A. Williams of Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts and University of Melbourne in Parkville,Victoria, Australia; Jason B. Mattingley of Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Williams et al.: "Correspondence: Do angry men get noticed?" Publishing in Current Biology 16, R402-404, June 6, 2006. www.current-biology.com


Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://PattiWood.net. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

If You Have Internet Access In Your Home You Are More Likely To Be In A Relationship

Internet Access at Home Increases the Likelihood That Adults Will Be in Relationships, Study Finds
Science Daily (Aug. 19, 2010) — Adults who have Internet access at home are much more likely to be in romantic relationships than adults without Internet access, according to research to be presented at the 105th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association.

"Although prior research on the social impacts of Internet use has been rather ambiguous about the social cost of time spent online, our research suggests that Internet access has an important role to play in helping Americans find mates," said Michael J. Rosenfeld, an associate professor of sociology at Stanford University and the lead author of the study, "Meeting Online: The Rise of the Internet as a Social Intermediary."

According to the study, 82.2 percent of participants who had Internet access at home also had a spouse or romantic partner, compared to a 62.8-percent partnership rate for adults who did not have Internet access. The paper uses data from Wave I of the How Couples Meet and Stay Together (HCMST) survey, a nationally representative survey of 4,002 adults, of whom 3,009 had a spouse or romantic partner.

In addition to finding that people are more likely to be in romantic relationships if they have Internet access in their homes, Rosenfeld and study co-author Reuben J. Thomas, an assistant professor of sociology at the City University of New York, found that the Internet is the one social arena that is unambiguously gaining importance over time as a place where couples meet.

"With the meteoric rise of the Internet as a way couples have met in the past few years, and the concomitant recent decline in the central role of friends, it is possible that in the next several years the Internet could eclipse friends as the most influential way Americans meet their romantic partners, displacing friends out of the top position for the first time since the early 1940s," Rosenfeld said.

The study also found that the Internet is especially important for finding potential partners in groups where the supply is small or difficult to identify such as in the gay, lesbian, and middle-aged heterosexual communities.

Among couples who met within two years of the HCMST Wave I survey in the winter of 2009, 61 percent of same-sex couples and 21.5 percent of heterosexual couples met online.

"Couples who meet online are much more likely to be same-sex couples, and somewhat more likely to be from different religious backgrounds," Rosenfeld said. "The Internet is not simply a new and more efficient way to keep in touch with our existing networks; rather the Internet is a new kind of social intermediary that may reshape the kinds of partners and relationships we have."




Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://PattiWood.net. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

People Who Lie On Online Dating Services Likely Are People-Pleasers Who Want To Present Themselves In The Most Favorable Light To Get Someone To Like

Online Daters Behave Similarly to Those Who Meet Face-to-Face, Researcher Says
ScienceDaily (Mar. 8, 2010) — People who lie on online dating services likely are people-pleasers who want to present themselves in the most favorable light to get someone to like them -- just as they would in face-to-face dating, according to a University of Kansas researcher.


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Jeffrey Hall, assistant professor of communication studies, surveyed more than 5,000 participants in a national Internet matchmaking service to determine what kinds of people are most likely to lie during the online dating process. He asked them how likely they were to lie about topics such as assets, relationship goals, personal interests, personal attributes, past relationships, age and weight.

"What people lie about depends on what kind of people they are," Hall said. "For example, if you're an extrovert, you might downplay the number of past relationships you've had because chances are you've had more relationships than an introvert."

Those most likely to lie during online dating experiences are "high self-monitors" -- people who have an acute sense of what people like and control their behavior to achieve social ends. Their actions are not necessarily manipulative, Hall said, but rather reflect a desire to be liked and to fit in.

Hall's research was published in the February issue of the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships.

In the study, men admitted to lying more overall, but women were most likely to lie about their weight. Because online daters hope to meet face-to-face eventually, the amount of lying is quite small, Hall said.

"Online daters shouldn't be concerned that most people are presenting a false impression of themselves," Hall said. "What influences face-to-face dating influences the online world




Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://PattiWood.net. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Communication In Hospitals. What happens When There Is Hand Off From One Shift To The Next?

Communication Often Fumbled During Patient Hand-Offs in Hospital
Science Daily (Mar. 13, 2010) — As shifts change in a hospital, outgoing physicians must "hand off" important information to their replacements in a brief meeting. But a new study of this hand-off process finds that the most important information is not fully conveyed in a majority of cases, even as physicians rate their communication as successful.


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The research, published by University of Chicago researchers in the March issue of Pediatrics, highlights the importance of educating doctors about successful communication skills during hand-offs. The results also emphasize the risk inherent in increased hand-offs necessitated by restrictions on medical resident work hours, even as further work limits are being discussed.

"When resident hours are shortened, you have more hand-offs," said Vineet Arora, MD, assistant professor of medicine at the University of Chicago Medical Center. "You could have concerns about either a tired physician who knows the patient or a well-rested physician that may not know the patient. The trade off is between fatigue and familiarity."

Conducted through a unique collaboration between physicians and psychologists at the University of Chicago, the study observed hand-off communication between pediatric interns -- first-year residents -- at Comer Children's Hospital at the University of Chicago. Interns at the end of an overnight shift would spend a total of 10-15 minutes sharing information about hospitalized patients with the resident relieving them in a designated hand-off room.

Both the outgoing and incoming interns were then asked by researchers about what they thought was the most important information conveyed during the hand-off about each patient. Surprisingly, what the outgoing intern identified as the most important information was not successfully communicated to the incoming intern 60 percent of the time. The rationale for certain medical decisions -- such as why a patient is on a particular drug or why the primary care physician should be contacted -- was also not understood by the receiving intern in a majority of cases.

But despite these miscommunication, interns on both sides of the hand-off consistently rated the quality of their communication as very high. Boaz Keysar, PhD, a professor of psychology at the University of Chicago and co- author of the paper, said that this disconnect between perceived and actual success of communication is common in other settings.

"You would imagine the kind of miscommunication we discover elsewhere actually might be reduced when the stakes are high in a clinical setting, because it matters so much," Keysar said. "But the opposite is true, which I think is counter-intuitive and important to know."

The results were even more striking given the optimal hand-off conditions for interns at Comer Children's Hospital. In each hand-off, a conversation takes place in a designated room under supervision by more experienced physicians. In previous research, Arora found that many hospitals and programs have much less organized hand-off procedures -- if they occur at all.

In illustrating the communication breakdowns that plague even best-case hand-off conditions, Arora and Keysar hope to inform medical centers and schools of the need for better education about hand-offs. The study found that "anticipatory guidance" -- offering to-do items or if-then advice -- was a more effective way of communicating information between interns than passing on knowledge items in bulk. Currently, Arora and colleagues are working on a simulation exercise for fourth-year medical students to train more effective hand-off communication skills.

Such training, they hope, will be more effective than relying upon computer programs and electronic medical records to facilitate hand-off communication. A verbal exchange of information remains important so that young doctors can make quick, informed decisions about patients, Arora said.

"IT solutions cannot substitute for a successful communication act," Arora said. "We aren't at the point where computers are going to do that for us. Technology solutions can help so that you have the information that you need when you need it, but to look at that information and be able to make a judgment about what to do, that is what the hand-off conversation is for."

But while researchers look for the best way to improve those conversations, Arora and Keysar hope that medical policymakers are aware of the risks inherent in the current hand-off model. As the Accreditation Council for General Medical Education ponders further restrictions upon the number of hours residents and interns can work, the consequences of those reduced hours must be acknowledged, they said.

"We tend to be very myopic in the way we think about this problem," Keysar said. "Reducing hours is good, but there's a cost that is not obvious at all, and this study really spells that cost out. It's very difficult for us to gauge how well we are understood, and this should be taken into account in the trade-off between number of work hours and fatigue."





Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://PattiWood.net. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Talking On The Cell Phone While Driving Can Make People Dislike You. First Impressions

Does talking on the cell phone while driving effect your impression?
New research shows that divers talking to people on the cell phone talked more than they listened. And used simpler words. This is so interesting. It makes me wonder if this is one of the behaviors that is pushing us to more narcissistic behavior. We are becoming more "ME" focused.
Read one of the quotes then an article on the original research below.

"Conversation analyses revealed some interesting patterns, according to the researchers. When driving tasks got more complicated, drivers appeared to modulate the complexity of their speech, as measured by syllables-per-word. Drivers also talked more when using cell phones, perhaps, the authors speculated, because they were trying to control the conversation to avoid using the mental resources required to really listen to the other person.

Meanwhile, passengers took an active role in supporting the driver, often talking about surrounding traffic. That shared situational awareness could be helpful to the
Drivers Distracted More By Cell Phones Than By Passengers
Science Daily (Dec. 1, 2008) — Drivers make more mistakes when talking on a cell phone than when talking to passengers, new research shows.


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This finding addresses the common question about whether driver distraction comes from cell-phone use specifically or conversation generally.

Even when drivers used a hands-free cell phone, driving performance was significantly compromised. "Cell phone and passenger conversation differ in their impact on a driver's performance; these differences are apparent at the operational, tactical, and strategic levels of performance," the researchers wrote.

The study, led by Frank Drews, PhD, of the University of Utah, analyzed the driving performance of 41 mostly young adult drivers paired with 41 friends who served as conversation partners. Both sexes were equally represented.

In each of three experimental conditions (conversation with hands-free cell phone, conversation in the car, or no conversation), one person in each pair was randomly selected to be the "driver" and the other the conversation partner.

Drivers used a sophisticated simulator that presented a 24-mile multi lane highway with on- and off-ramps, overpasses and two-lane traffic in each direction. Participants drove under an irregular-flow condition that mimics real highway conditions -- with other vehicles, in compliance with traffic laws, changing lanes and speeds. This context required "drivers" to pay attention to surrounding traffic.

In the cell-phone conversation condition, drivers' conversation partners were at another location. In the in-car conversation condition, partners sat next to their (simulated) drivers. In both cases, conversation partners were told to tell one another a previously undisclosed "close call" story about a time their lives were threatened.

All drivers were instructed to leave the simulated highway once they arrived at a rest area about eight miles from the starting point. Partners were told the driver had this task. The driving sequences took about 10 minutes to finish.

Drivers talking by cell phone drove significantly worse than drivers talking to passengers. The cell-phone users were more likely to drift in their lane, kept a greater distance between their car and the car in front, and were four times more likely to miss pulling off the highway at the rest area. Passenger conversation barely affected all three measures.

The authors said the problems could have stemmed from inattention "blindness," or insufficient processing of information from the driving environment. Cell-phone users may also have found it harder to hold in working memory the intent to exit at the rest area.

Conversation analyses revealed some interesting patterns, according to the researchers. When driving tasks got more complicated, drivers appeared to modulate the complexity of their speech, as measured by syllables-per-word. Drivers also talked more when using cell phones, perhaps, the authors speculated, because they were trying to control the conversation to avoid using the mental resources required to really listen to the other person.

Meanwhile, passengers took an active role in supporting the driver, often talking about surrounding traffic. That shared situational awareness could be helpful to the




Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://PattiWood.net. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Is Talking On Your Cell Phone Bad For Your Relationship?

This research article simply states a distracted listener is more likely to make mistakes that could harm a relationship.

Talking On Your Cell Phone While Driving May Be Hazardous To Your Close Relationships
Science Daily (June 15, 2010) — Warnings about the dangers of distracted driving while using a cell phone are prevalent these days, but cell phone use while driving may also put family relationships in jeopardy, says University of Minnesota professor Paul Rosenblatt.


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The same factors that make using a cell phone while driving more hazardous -- longer reaction times and impaired attention -- can also make family communication in that situation more risky, says Rosenblatt in an article in the current issue of Family Science Review. The article, authored by Rosenblatt and graduate student Xiaohui Li, provides a speculative theoretical analysis on the topic. Rosenblatt is a family social science professor in the university's College of Education and Human Development.

"If we assume that the relationship risks involved in talking on a cell phone while driving are similar to the driving risks -- both tasks involve divided attention and distraction -- we can develop ideas about how a family relationship may be impaired," Rosenblatt says in the article.

For example, studies have indicated that cell phone use while driving leads to slower reaction times on the road. This could translate to the driver's cell phone conversation as well.

"A delay in the conversation could be a problem if the person (spouse or partner) on the other end of the conversation interprets the delayed reaction as an indicator of ambivalence, of not having a ready answer or of hiding something. This all leads to upsetting the partner," Rosenblatt says.

And, what if the driver misses important details of the conversation? This could lead to misunderstandings and more hard feelings, he says.

"In general, cell phone usage while driving might lead to missed relationship stop lights, slow reactions to dangerous relationship circumstances, loss of control of one's part of the interaction, and interaction mistakes that could lead to conflict, hurt feelings, misunderstandings, and possibly even serious damage to the relationship," Rosenblatt says in the article.

The partner who is not driving might be worried about the driver's safety and may cut a conversation short so the driver can concentrate, but the driver might interpret that in a negative way.

In addition to the relationship problems created by talking on cell phone while driving, a number of problems arise that both people have when one of them is driving while talking on a cell phone.

The lack of visual cues including gestures, facial expressions and posture creates challenges. Poor cell phone reception and the noise from the automobile and the road can all contribute to misunderstandings, he says.

In the article, Rosenblatt explores five hypothetical examples of possible relationship problems that could arise when a driver is talking with a family member via cell phone. The examples he explores include the partner asking the driver to run an errand; a family member calls with good news; a family member calls with bad news; arguments over the phone and apologies over the phone. Each of the scenarios can be wrought with frustration and misunderstanding.

Most relationships can manage the added difficulties related to cell phone use.

"However, for couples in which things have been so difficult that they both are considering ending the relationship, problems arising from a difficult phone conversation, may push their relationship to the tipping point," Rosenblatt says.



Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://PattiWood.net. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

How Accurate Are First Impressions Made From Viewing People In Photos?

How accurate are personality assessments made of people in photographs?

I quote this research to my audiences so they know how much information is communicated in an instant.

First Impressions Count When Making Personality Judgments, New Research Shows
Science Daily (Nov. 4, 2009) — First impressions do matter when it comes to communicating personality through appearance, according to new research by psychologists Laura Naumann of Sonoma State University and Sam Gosling of The University of Texas at Austin.

•Despite the crucial role of physical appearance in creating first impressions, until now little research has examined the accuracy of personality impressions based on appearance alone. These findings will be published in the December 2009 issue of Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, co-written with Simine Vazire (Washington University in St. Louis) and Peter J. Rentfrow (University of Cambridge).

"In an age dominated by social media where personal photographs are ubiquitous, it becomes important to understand the ways personality is communicated via our appearance," says Naumann. "The appearance one portrays in his or her photographs has important implications for their professional and social life."

In the study, observers viewed full-body photographs of 123 people they had never met before. The targets were viewed either in a controlled pose with a neutral facial expression or in a naturally expressed pose. The accuracy of the judgments was gauged by comparing them to the aggregate of self-ratings and that of three informants who knew the targets well, a criterion now widely regarded as the gold standard in personality research.

Even when viewing the targets in the controlled pose, the observers could accurately judge some major personality traits, including extraversion and self-esteem. But most traits were hard to detect under these conditions. When observers saw naturally expressive behavior (such as a smiling expression or energetic stance), their judgments were accurate for nine of the 10 personality traits. The 10 traits were extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, emotional stability, openness, likability, self-esteem, loneliness, religiosity and political orientation.

"We have long known that people jump to conclusions about others on the basis of very little information," says Gosling, "but what's striking about these findings is how many of the impressions have a kernel of truth to them, even on the basis of something as simple a single photograph."

Gosling cautioned that observers still make plenty of mistakes, but noted that this latest work is important because it sheds new light on the sources of accuracy and inaccuracy of judgments.

With this kind of knowledge, individuals can choose to alter their appearance in specific ways, either to make identity claims or shape others impressions of them, Naumann says.

"If you want potential employers or romantic suitors to see you as a warm and friendly individual, you should post pictures where you smile or are standing in a relaxed pose," suggests Naumann.

For example, whether you smile and how you stand (tense vs. relaxed, energetic vs. tired) are important cues to judge a variety of traits. Extraverts smile more, stand in energetic and less tense ways, and look healthy, neat and stylish. People who are more open to experience are less likely to have a healthy, neat appearance, but are more likely to have a distinctive style of dress.

The researchers also found males who have a neat and healthy appearance are often seen as more conscientious. However, defining personality in women was more difficult because they were more strongly influenced by cultural demands to look presentable.

Digital high-resolution images demonstrating the standardized and spontaneous full-body photographs are available upon request.


Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://PattiWood.net. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Can Opposites Attract?


Patti Wood, author of "Success Signals," looks at the body language of Courteney Cox and David Arquette for OK Weekly Magazine. Patti says that even though they are totally opposite their body language is living proof that opposites attract and can develop into a wonderful relationship!
http://www.scribd.com/doc/34274000/OK-CourteneyDavid

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

What's Going On With Brad?


It seems as if Brad is always in the background or lagging behind when he is seen with Angelina. Patti Wood, body language expert, weighs in on this situation for Life & Style Weekly. See what Patti says at the link!

http://www.scribd.com/doc/34852052/Life-Style-a

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Publicity Or Passion?


Patti Wood, body language expert, reveals what she sees behind the exterior of George Clooney and Sarah Larson for OK Weekly Magazine. Is it just publicity or is there passion behind their body language? Details at the link!

http://www.scribd.com/doc/34274003/OK-GeorgeSarah


Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Boost Your People Smarts, Good Housekeeping


Patti Wood, body language expert, says "Don't just listen to what others tell you - learn how to read their body language to find out what they are "really" saying." Patti discusses some clues that will help you become more "people smart" in Good Housekeeping's Quick & Simple.
http://www.scribd.com/doc/34852033/GHQuick-Simple-Boost-Your-People-Smarts


Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Is This Duo Totally In Tune?


Patti Wood, body language expert, weighs in on this photo of the duo, Gavin Rossdale and Gwen Stefani for OK Weekly Magazine. This couple has always appeared to be in love. What is their body language revealing? Check the link below!

http://www.scribd.com/doc/34274005/OK-GwenGavin

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://PattiWood.net. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Teaching College Students To Shake Hands

I just got this feedback from a professor at Purdue. He used the tools he learned in my workshop last week with his students.

Dear Patti,
Thank you very much for all the coaching you provided last week! I enjoyed the program so much. I learned a lot of new things, but I also re-discovered some forgotten attributes of my presentation skills and … of myself . I already applied many of the learned skills to my first lecture yesterday to sophomore students. Boy did they work! I used the hand-shake attention-getter and it fit perfectly with this class. This is the first class students take in electrical engineering, so the analogy to hand-shaking with a new person is obvious. This was also the first time I introduced a class with zero power point slides. Open gestures and taking more space added the right amount of confidence as well.

Research presentations are my next frontier…

Associate Professor
Purdue University


Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

What's Behind Their Smile?


Patti Wood, body language expert, examines these dazzling celebrity smiles for Star Magazine and reveals the startling personality secrets behind their smiles. The link below has all the details!

http://www.scribd.com/doc/34852089/Star-Behind-the-Smile


Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Public Speaking and Body Language

Body Language when you're speaking can seem difficult. My most frequently asked question is, "What do I do with my hands when I am giving a speech?" First and foremost, let your hands show. Specifically you want to make sure the palms of your hands show. We are wired to look at the palms of the hands to see if you are armed and dangerous. So make sure your hands are open and so look safe. Because there is a tendency for some people to hide their hands when they lie, you also want to make sure you show the palms of your hands when you are speaking to look honest. A simple trick if you're stressed is to put your right hand in your pocket and hold on to a nickle. It anchors you and magically your left hand will gesture. I have given that trick to my coaching clients and they are amazed how effective it is. For more tips, go to my official website link http://www.pattiwood.net/
Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

A Cold Shoulder - What It Reveals!


Body language expert, Patti Wood, checks out the cues that Kate Beckinsale is sending out as she stands beside Len Wiseman for OK Weekly Magazine. Check out why Patti says there might be "dark times" ahead for this couple because of Kate's stance. Find out what it reveals!

http://www.scribd.com/doc/34274006/OK-LenKate

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

What Do Different Handholds Reveal?




Patti Wood, body language expert, examines the way Tom and Katie are holding hands for Life & Style Weekly. Are you wondering what is behind the way they are holding hands? Check the link for all the details!
http://www.scribd.com/doc/34273544/LifeStyle-TomKatie

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

A Solo Act


Patti Wood, body language expert, uncovers what is going on between Madonna and Guy Ritchie for OK Weekly. It seems that Madonna is fighting for her independence from Guy. What brings Patti to that conclusion.....what are the clues? Check the link!

http://www.scribd.com/doc/34274008/OK-MadonnaGuy

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

How Dads Show They Love Their Daughters


Patti Wood, body language expert, reads the body language of children and their dads in First For Women Magazine. She reveals what's behind an upturned hand, turned-in feet, a raised chin and palms pointing upward. Who's really wrapped around whose finger? Find out at the link!



Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Losing Their Steam?

What are the cues that Patti Wood, body language expert, picked up on for OK Weekly that led her to say, "Rebecca Gayheart and Eric Dane do not look like a happy couple." Details at the link below!
http://www.scribd.com/doc/34274012/OK-RebeccaEric

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Matching And Mirroring

Author of "Success Signals - Body Language in Business," Patti Wood. is quoted in Auto Success Magazine on the topic of "Matching and Mirroring."
Patti says that rapport creates a feeling of trust and safety between you and the other person. She discusses ways in which you can consciously match or mirror to create rapport. Check the link!
http://www.scribd.com/doc/34851919/Auto-Success-Matching-and-Mirroring

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

A Fine Duet

Patti Wood, body language expert, is quoted in OK Weekly saying that she thinks Pink and Todd Morse seem totally in tune. There are several interesting body language cues that she reveals about them. Wondering? Check the link!
http://www.scribd.com/doc/34274011/OK-PinkTodd

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Support System

Patti Wood, body language expert, tells OK Weekly that Rupert Friend and Keira Knightley are on the same physical plane. What are the cues that Patti picked up on that reveal this? Check the link to find out!
http://www.scribd.com/doc/34274015/OK-RupertKeira

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Reading Your Audience's Body Language


Wouldn't it be great if you could get inside the minds of your audience and know what they are thinking about your presentation? Patti Wood, body language expert and author of "Success Signals - Body Language in Business" outlines 8 cues in Club Solutions Magazine to help you understand your audience's body language. Learn these valuable cues at the link!

http://www.scribd.com/doc/34851926/Club-Solutions-ReadingYourAudience

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Are They Lying?


Patti Wood, body language expert and professional speaker, shares her insights with Auto Success Magazine about deception detection. The general population is only able to detect deception 50% of the time. Patti gives several steps which will increase your accuracy as soon as you begin to use them. Check them out at the link!
http://www.scribd.com/doc/34851975/Auto-Success-Are-They-Lying

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Jay Leno On Oprah, Celebrity Body Language, Truth Or Deception?

Leno's Oprah Interview: What Jay's Body Language Reveals.
Actions always speak louder than words. Which is why we asked the experts to take apart Jay Leno's Oprah sit-down with a fine tooth comb to find out what is really going on behind the chin. Yes, maybe we have seen too much Leno over the past month, but his interview with Oprah seemed different since something about Ms. O makes people tell the truth (much to their chagrin) and show off some raw emotions. We were not disappointed. But because Jay is such a consummate performer, questions remain. Was he earnest? Uncomfortable? Cocky? Why did he keep crossing and uncrossing his legs? See what our experts have to say after the jump.

Jay walked onto the Burbank set with his hands in his pockets, which according to body language expert Patti Wood, is a signal that you are preparing to hide your emotional state. When he sat opposite Oprah (the interviewee seat is an uncomfortable place for Jay) he did an "arm-leg lock", which is a male leg cross with a hand wrapped around the leg.
That leg lock is a fascinating signal of protection," explained body language expert Patti Wood. "It was saying I am powerful but I feel the need to protect myself. He isn't use to being in the left-hand chair."

Which is totally fair since Oprah came out guns slinging. Instead of her typical celebrity soft-ball questions where everyone feels happy and at ease until she throws in a little zinger before returning to happy Oprah-land, O went at Jay with everything she had.

"Jay started gripping the arms of his chair early on in between folding them over his legs. He didn't like her taking him to that dark emotional place," Wood said. "And when Oprah asked whether the experience has changed him, his non-verbal response was to take his right hand and scratch down his cheek in sign of self-beating, demonstrating just how injured he feels."

Some of the strongest non-verbal cues that Jay was giving off came at the beginning of the interview when he told Oprah that leaving 'The Tonight Show"the first time around broke his heart. He meant it!!!

"Jay flashed what was known as a micro-expression; a facial expression that is very fleeting, but that reveals the emotion being felt at that moment. These are very hard to conceal. This micro-expression was one of sincere sadness. With this expression, the inner corners of the eyebrows are pulled up and in simultaneously, with the corners of the mouth being pulled down. "If you watch closely, you can also see that his eyes became 'misty' momentarily," said body language expert Vincent Harris, author of 'The Productivity Epiphany."

When talking about Jimmy Kimmel mocking him on his own show, Jay said "I got sucker punched." Oprah naturally pushed and asked him how he felt about said sucker-punch.

"He extended both hands and arms as though he was pushing something away. This was indicative of being very uncomfortable with Kimmel's comments from before and wanting Oprah to move on with her questioning," Harris said.

When Oprah asked Jay if he had any hard feelings towards Conan he may have tried to sound upbeat and positive, but his body language betrayed him.

"His response was that he had no hard feelings at all. But as soon as he said that he moved an arm across his body to protect himself and rubbed his ear which is an indication of insincerity," Wood said. "It really stood out because I believe he was being honest and straightforward throughout most of the piece, but not here."

http://www.popeater.com/2010/01/29/jay-leno-oprah-interview/

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

They're In Sync

Patti Wood, body language expert, reads the nonverbal cues that Lindsay Lohan and DJ Samantha Ronson are exhibiting for OK Weekly. Find out why Patti says they are in sync with how they feel about each other at the link.
http://www.scribd.com/doc/34274016/OK-SamLindsay

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

First Impressions - What You Do Makes A Differance

Menstuff® has information on Body Language

Body Language Basics
What Your Body Language Says About You

From a flip of the hair to hands on your hips, how you move, gesture, and make expressions can say as much as what comes out of your mouth.

Angel Rose, 34, an assistant vice president at a bank in upstate New York, was interviewing candidates for a teller position, which required that a person have good people and communication skills, a professional presentation, and a strong focus on customer service, among other abilities. One candidate in particular stood out, but not in a good way. While she could have been very intelligent, her nonverbal communication and body language were way off. Her handshake was more of a finger shake, her eye contact was nonexistent, and her slouched posture exuded insecurity. For Rose, what the candidate said didn't matter because her body language spoke volumes: she wasn't a good fit for the position.

Patti Wood, author of "Success Signals: A Guide to Reading Body Language"
explains that body language is everything from our facial expressions, to eye contact, to our gestures, stance, and posture. While the nuances of body language are complicated, there are some common body language signs worth a thousand words.

Body Language ABCs
Flipping your hair, shaking hands, making eye contact, and smiling are more than just movements -- they're a part of your nonverbal communication, adding emphasis and emotion.

What are some of the basic body language cues that we display and what kind of effect can they have on the impression we make on other people? Here's a beginner's guide to understanding what our bodies are saying:

Handshakes - A handshake can say so much more than hello, nice to meet you. "The most important part of a handshake is palm-to-palm contact," says Wood. "It's even more significant than the grip."

The "palm-to-palm" contact expresses an intention of honesty and openness, and that your interaction will be sincere and nonthreatening.

The "limp fish" handshake, Wood explains, seems so uncomfortable because it usually means that the palms don't touch, as Rose experienced in her interview.

Here are other handshake types:

Bone crusher: A person may be insecure and trying to overcompensate with an over-the-top hello.
Palm-down handshake: A person may be trying to express his dominance.
A left-handed wrap of the handshake from the top: A person may be trying to express his dominance.
A left-handed wrap of the handshake from underneath: A person may be trying to support and comfort you.

Synchrony - Synchrony happens when two people who are interacting mirror body language cues, explains Buck. What can it mean?
"Synchrony is a signal that both people are on the same page," says Buck. "When you see someone copying your body language, or you notice that you are copying his, it's a clue that you are probably sharing a similar mind-set at the time."

Posture
"Posture can be sign of dominance or submissiveness," says Buck.

Shoulders back with an erect posture can be a sign of dominance, he explains, while being slumped can mean insecurity, guilt, or a feeling of shame.

Eye contact - "While the rules of eye-contact engagement vary from culture to culture, in the U.S., it can mean honesty and forthrightness," says Buck.
The eyes are a powerful part of our body language cues and can express everything from sexual interest, to annoyance, to happiness and pain, he explains.

Playing with your hair - When a woman cups her hand, palm out, and tucks her hair behind her ear, it can be an expression of flirting, and can mean openness and interest, explains Wood. But be careful: It can also mean her hair is in her eyes.

Using Body Language to Your Advantage
"If you want to better manage your own body language, you need to think about every aspect of your day and how you behave," says Wood. While you might think you are a friendly person, if you go straight to your office and avoid eye contact with anyone, it can send the wrong signals to your co-workers, she explains. Go through your morning routine -- what you do at lunch, how you spend your afternoon and evening -- and ask yourself questions like: Do I smile? Do I make appropriate eye contact with people? Once you better recognize your body language, you can start to manage it in a more meaningful way.

On the flip side, how can you use the body language of others to your advantage? Most important is to trust your gut. "Body language says so much, that you can use it to gauge the sincerity of what a person is saying," says Wood. If a person is telling you something, and he's covering his mouth, he might be lying, she explains. If a person's hands rub from his forehead down across his face, he could be wiping away an emotion, like stress or anxiety. Either way, if what a person is saying contradicts his body language, your intuition might be picking up on something that is not quite right.

Still, whether you are trying to manage your body language better, or understand that of others, remember the value of words. "If you become too attentive to body language, instead of what you are saying or someone is saying to you, you miss out on the larger process of communication," says Buck.

Body Language Put to the Test
A basic understanding of body language, combined with verbal communication, can come in handy in almost every situation in your daily life. Here are some common scenarios in which body language can have a big impact, plus tips for putting your best foot forward while you watch what others around you are saying with their silent signs.

First dates - First dates are laden with body language signs that can help you gauge whether or not a person is interested. "Men tend to talk a lot on first dates when they're interested in a woman," says Wood. "If you're interested back, make eye contact and listen." If either person isn't interested, and looks around the room and avoids eye contact, that's a sign that a second date isn't likely.

Other first-date tips - "When men touch a woman on the small of her back to walk her through a door, that's a sign of confidence and interest," says Wood. For women, it's the length of their touch that measures their interest. While short, less-than-a-second touches are appropriate, touches that are too long could convey an intimate meaning.

Job interviews - First and foremost, don't sit down while you wait for your interviewer to come and greet you; it puts you in an awkward position where you have to stand and gather yourself and your belongings in an odd sort of shuffle. "Instead, stand and wait, or sit on the arm of a chair," says Wood. "And when your interviewer arrives, make eye contact, raise your eyebrows slightly in acknowledgement, smile, and then shake hands." During the interview, she suggests you make eye contact when listening to show your interest, but don't stare. Sit up in your chair instead of slouching, and when you're done, leave strong by giving a good, palm-to-palm handshake.

Dinner with the in-laws - "One of the most important body language signs you should convey during your first encounter with your partner's parents is eye contact with your partner," says Wood. Your partner's parents want to know that you are interested in and care for their child. The best way you can tell them that you are "the one" is to look at your partner with love and affection.
Source: Heather Hatfield, www.webmd.com/sex-relationships/features/body-language-basics

What Your Body Language Says About You
When you walk into a room full of colleagues, bosses, or clients, you might not say a word in the first few minutes but your body language has already spoken volumes about the type of person and worker you might be. Well over half of all communication is projected through body language, though we frequently aren’t aware of the language our body is speaking in important situations. Make sure your body language doesn’t have your career speaking in tongues and learn the physical lingo of a successful worker with the advice below.

Body Language Says: Shifty eyes that avoid eye contact with others.
What Others See and Hear: A lack of eye contact hinders your ability to create a connection with the person or people you’re speaking with. This oversight (no pun intended) gives others few reasons to trust you and your ideas. To build bonds and trustworthiness, actively concentrate on looking people in the eye not only when you are speaking but when they start talking as well.
Work that Works for You: A career as a telemarketer or in data entry means that you can keep your eyes on your work—and not on your coworkers—for most of the time.

Body Language Says: Arms crossed in front of your body, holding your torso tight.
What Others See and Hear: Crossed arms make you appear guarded, unapproachable, and on the defense, as though you have something to hide from the people in the room with you. If you’re having trouble relaxing your arms, try folding them neatly in your lap instead of across your chest.
Work that Works for You: Being on the defensive works wonderfully with a career in insurance, where skepticism is a favorable trait.

Body Language Says: A broad grin showing all of your pearly whites.
What Others See and Hear: A smiling face suggests that you are eager, confident, and pleasant to work with. However, be careful not to smile too much when talking about serious subjects, as your grin might suggest that you aren’t taking the discussion seriously enough.
Work that Works for You: If you’re naturally a pleasant person, a career in sales is the perfect place for you to use your charm on customers.

Body Language Says: Fidgeting, tapping, or shaking incessantly.
What Others See and Hear: If you can’t remain still in a meeting or conversation, your constant movements make you look uncomfortable with yourself and others, which can cause a domino effect making other people in the room uncomfortable as well. If your hands shake, try discreetly holding a small object, like a pen. Keep your hands out of your pockets and your legs crossed to avoid other fidgeting and tapping.
Work that Works for You: Fidgeting is usually a sign of not having the ability to stand being cooped up in meetings, so try a field like healthcare or retail that takes you out of an office.

Body Language Says: A stance as strong as an oak-tree.
What Others See and Hear: Great posture suggests that you are confident, can lead well, are trustworthy, and are rooted in your beliefs. Just make sure that your excellent posture isn’t negated by a stiff, immobile upper body.
Work that Works for You: Perfect posture is a must for someone working as an executive or in marketing, positions where confidence is crucial to success.

Body Language Says: Legs wide open, arms stretched out, taking up lots of space.
What Others See and Hear: You’re clearly comfortable with yourself and don’t mind being noticed, but taking up too much space in a small room can be perceived as thoughtless and arrogant. Furthermore, your casual stance may limit the ability of others to take you as seriously as you might like. Try taking up less space by bringing your legs and arms closer to your torso and sitting up straighter in your chair for a more professional demeanor.
Work that Works for You: The need to be seen is a must for someone in command of a group of people, and as a teacher or in a management position you’ll find your need to spread yourself around to be an added bonus.

Body Language Says: Leaning towards the person who is talking.
What Others See and Hear: A subtle lean towards the individual who is presenting indicates that you are a gracious listener and are interested and respectful of what the other person has to say. Be sure not to dive too deeply into the other person’s space—leaning too closely may move the other person out of their comfort zone.
Work that Works for You: Any field like hospitality where a pleasant bond between two people is needed in order to have a successful outcome is a great choice for you if you’re a natural leaner.

Body Language Says: A shirttail out, a missing button, and other slovenly behaviors.
What Others See and Hear: You can’t expect people to take you seriously if you don’t take the time to put yourself together properly. A quick check in the mirror and a change of shirt could make or break your career trajectory in many fields.
Work that Works for You: If you’d rather people focus more on your accomplishments than your clothes, look to careers that are notable for their casual nature, like computer and internet-oriented jobs.

Source: jobs.aol.com/article/_a/what-your-body-language-says-about-you/* * *

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

7 Nonverbal Secrets For The Salesperson

According to Patti Wood, author of "Success Signals - Body Language in Business," 85% of the buying decision is not based on what you say, but what you do nonverbally. Patti discusses 7 nonverbal secrets in Club Solutions Magazine that will help you land more deals and close more sales. Learn the power of the "silent sell" at the link!
http://www.scribd.com/doc/34851923/Club-Solutions-7-Nonverbal-Secrets-for-the-Salesperson

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Bush's Yo' Blair Greeting

I have been blogging not only on this blog on body language, but also my speech coach blog about the increase in informality in communication. Here is an example from a media interview I did several years ago.

The link below contains some strong language by George Bush and my comments to a journalist.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/politics/8650086.stm

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://PattiWood.net. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Celeb Love Signals


A guy may use the same PDAs with past and present mates, but the nuances of his moves often communicate different messages. Body language expert, Patti Wood, does her analyzing thing for Cosmopolitan Magazine and sheds light on the love signals of Brad Pitt, Ben Afflack and Nick Lachey at the link below.

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.




Sarah Palin

Someone asked me recently about Sarah Palin's winks. Here is a reference and link to a read I did for the media of Sarah's winking in the Vice Presidential debates.

Winking Sarah Palin flirted with the entire nation during her vice presidential debate with Delaware Democratic Sen. Joe Biden Oct. 2 in St. Louis.

Not only that, she didn't wink once, but six times, according to body language expert Patti Wood, author of "Success Signals," who counted six.
http://palinsexismwatch.blogspot.com/2008/10/southwestern-michigan-college-daily.html

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Revealing Body Language


Patti Wood, body language expert, tells Star Magazine what Mary-Kate Olsen and Akiva reveal about their relationship by their body language. What's behind the cradling and touching? Patti has the answers at the link!

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

How To Dress For Graduations And Church - A Body Language Expert's Opinions

Last week I went to my friend's MBA graduation ceremony at Kennessaw University. My friends and I were so proud and excited to see our friend earn his MBA after two years of hard work and while working full time at his corporate marketing job.
The ceremony was wonderful. I will post on my speech coach blog my thoughts on the speeches. I wanted to share with you my thoughts on the way people dressed for the graduation.

It was 98 degrees in Atlanta on the day of the graduation. Standing in front of my suit closet I couldn't imagine putting on a silk blouse and suit even though the ceremony was going to be inside. We were parking with over a thousand other friends and family of future graduates and I assumed we would need to hike in from a distant parking lot. That ruled out high heels for me as well. I would have loved to have worn a dress, but I am five feet tall and I look like a little girl in a dress without high heels.

I wanted to show my honor and respect for the graduates, so I chose a white linen jacket and pants. Why am I detailing my struggle to dress appropriately for the event despite the heat and walking distance? Because my friends and I, in our respective dresses, felt like a Mayberry, Brady Bunch, time traveler from another Galaxy when we got there. There were fellow students and hundreds of parents wearing shorts, blue jeans, t-shirts and even flip flops for a college graduation. Perhaps they all thought they were being videotaped for a possible guest on "What not to Wear." Perhaps I am being to critical. After all I know I have dyslexia and can't see spelling and grammatical errors. Perhaps there is a disorder that keeps you from seeing your fashion mistakes.
Out of the two thousand or so audience members I would say half were dressed very nicely, but my friends and I were shocked to see the rest. Was I crazy to think that you should dress nicely on that one special day celebrating so much hard work and persistence on the part of the 800 or so graduates? I was a nerdette in high school and I still may be one today writing about the proper dress for a graduation. What did my friends wear? The other women wore dresses and the guys were all wearing crisp long sleeved button down shirts and nice crisply pressed pants. They were so handsome. It looked like they called each other to dress as they had a nice assortment of colors from pink, to blue to grey and white shirts.

Here are my rough notes from a journalist request on the topic of
Dressing for Church,
My response to a journalist request.
I am a body language expert and I live in Atlanta. I love that churches now have a casual dress service. With a casual service more people feel comfortable going to church as they don’t have to “dress up.”. I also believe that overdressing for church is more about appearance, looking good for other people rather than honoring God. On the other hand flip flops, slogan t-shirts and caps show a lack of respect for others in the congregation. You are going to church not Disney World! I also know as a body language expert that how you dress affects your behavior. Research indicates that formal business attire formalizes your communication and interactions. You are more guarded and distant in a suit and tie, that’s why you take off your tie the minute you get around friends and that it is also just more comfortable. In the workplace casual dress codes increase morale but do not increase productivity. Observing the effect of dress on behavior as a body language expert, I think casual dress relaxes behavior, both good and bad behavior. I included research finding on business dress below my sig line.

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://PattiWood.net. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Two Cozy

Body language expert, Patti Wood, is quoted in Ok Weekly about the coziness of Sebastian & Leighton. What does it reveal about this couple?
Details at the link!
http://www.scribd.com/doc/34274018/OK-SebastianLeightonTwo Cozy


Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

How To Tell If Someone Likes Your Cooking - Body Language At The Dinner Table

How to Tell if Someone Likes Your Cooking by Reading Body Language my quotes in Every Day With Rachel Ray.

Discover what they really think about your cooking. Body language expert, Patti Wood, says to look for these telling gestures.
By Eliza Borné Photography by Peter Arkle

Closed Eyes
When food tastes really good, some people shut their eyes to block out other senses and enjoy it. Take this as a sign that you did something right!

Scrunched Nose and Lips
Unhappy eaters might slightly turn up their noses and lips when they’re displeased with a bite. It lasts an instant, so watch the person you most want to satisfy.

Stomach Touching
Often assumed to mean someone is full, touching the stomach after eating actually signifies satisfaction. “They want to hold in the pleasant feeling,” says Wood.

Turning away
Whereas people who like their food will surround their plate, those who don’t will often lean away, pulling back their chests or leaning against the back of the chair.

Speak Up!

http://www.rachaelraymag.com/Every-Day-Living/Every-Day-Advice/Instant-Help/how-to-tell-if-someone-likes-your-cooking


Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Make A Great Impression On The Phone

There are certain techniques you can use to improve your effectiveness on the phone and create a positive impression. Patti Wood, body language expert, who has over 20 years of experience researching and teaching nonverbal communication shares her insights for The Business Journal. Check out the 8 techniques at the link.
http://www.scribd.com/doc/34851953/The-Business-Journal-Make-a-Great-Impression-on-the-Phone

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Sandra Bullocks' Body Language

My read on Sandra Bullocks' body language on People Mag quoted on website http://www.limelife.com/blog-entry/Sandra-Bullock-Traumatized-Child/42079.html

Body language expert weighs in
Is Sandra Bullock traumatized? While many people declared a recent body language expert article to be reaching, there's a lot to be analyzed in Sandra's initial public appearances after her estranged husband's cheating scandal. Do you agree or disagree with the celeb expert?

Sandra was wearing a dark outfit when she ventured outside recently, looking like she was trying to shield herself from the paparazzi.

Body language expert, Patti Wood, spoke with US Weekly magazine, saying that Sandra Bullock's body language while hiking makes her look "traumatized."

"She is gripping the coffee cup very high up," Wood said. "That's what you do when you really want to grab hold of something and show your power. She's really making it obvious and playing toward the camera to show that empty finger."

Good for her if she is trying to give us a glimpse of that empty finger! Patti also took a look at Sandra's clothing choice for the outing and said that she picked protective items.

"She's chosen a heavily padded jacket and has it zipped up very high," Wood said. "The choice of her scarf, which is tied over heart, means that she is hiding her heart window and throat window, which is the communication window." The colors, Woods explains, are "protection choices. Black is a protection color."

"She looks like a child who's been traumatized," Wood said. "Her face takes on attributes of a child who's experiencing a deep pain."

Do you believe this kind of analysis, or is it poppycock? I think there is plenty of truth to body language and color choice studies, and it just gets a little embroidered for these purposes.



Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://pattiwood.net/. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Media And Politians' Body Language

Politicians' public-friendly stunts
Does it impact their governing?

By JOANNE RICHARD, Special to QMI Agency

Last Updated: August 6, 2010 10:00pm
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Federal Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff and his tour bus made a stop at MuchMusic in Toronto. (Michael Peake/QMI Agency) From singalongs to festival jigs, politicians are croonin’ and movin’ to the political beat.

Iggy got jiggy at MuchMusic recently. Federal Liberal party leader Michael Ignatieff staged a conga line and danced several feet onto his tour bus in downtown Toronto.

Remember Stephen Harper’s attempted singalong at the National Arts Centre Gala last year? And just last week President Obama made a sit-down appearance on The View, marking the first-ever appearance by a president on a daytime talk show.


According to Patti Wood, these politicians are working hard at increasing their likability factor in order to appear more approachable and connected. “Showing their soft, fluffy, likable side is a way of getting more media coverage.

“It’s a shift from gravitas to gregarious!” adds Wood, body language expert and author of Success Signals. “Politicians seem reconciled that it is difficult, if not impossible, to be credible to gain our trust and respect, so they are singing, dancing, and cracking jokes on talk shows in a bid for media attention that gives them popularity. They are using their charisma to at least be likable.”

Dr. Lillian Glass agrees. “Politicians are so vilified that they’re trying to make themselves appear more human and likable – they’re just building up their image points and leave a better impression for when the mud and dirt start to fling.”

Glass, a body language/communications expert, adds that although their songs and dances are superficial, they will impact how some people vote.

Author Sanjay Burman says that “seeing politicians who can’t dance but shed their insecurities to go out and have fun, makes us see a personable side to them.

“Stephen Harper shaking hands with his youngest son on the first day of school showed us he is just as stiff as we thought.”

And his singing stint was off-key in the warmth department too.

Burman, of burmanbooks.com, says that we love Obama as a person “because he shows us that he is the same as we are. He is intelligent, successful, loving, genuine and fun. He plays basketball, jokes during interviews and always has his family around.

“I have a problem trusting Ignatieff,” adds Burman, a master hypnotherapist and author of "Reading People and Do Everything They Tell You Not To Do."

“His eyebrows are always covering his face. He keeps his distance when shaking hands with people and even when he smiles he keeps a stern look.”

According to Hogan, song and dance are all for show. “They are trying to achieve their 51% and they know that people filter by identity prior to political views. It simply makes good sense to literally touch as many humans as possible. Those people you touch that you can identify, you are much, much more likely to vote for at the polls.”


When it comes to appealing to certain demographics, politicians know exactly where to aim.

Obama is losing support in the unemployed and also the upper income groups, says Hogan. "He's trying to get back "in" with the lower income America by hitting The View. It's a smart strategy on his part - it isn’t going to help a whole lot but it's probably better than not doing the gig!"

Looks count

Superficial, non-verbal cues, such as politicians’ appearance, greatly sway voting choices. Voters make judgments about politicians’ competence based on their facial appearance.

-June 2010 issue of the Journal of Nonverbal Behavior

“Attractive candidates get more news coverage than less attractive ones, reports Patti Wood, body language expert. “And it’s more important for a female politician to be attractive if she wants to get media coverage.”

The bottom line: People generally want to be with good looking people – they even value them as being more worthy.
http://www.calgarysun.com/life/2010/08/05/14930736.html


Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at http://PattiWood.net. Also check out the body language quiz on her YouTube Channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.