How Dogs View Human Eye Contact. How Can You Tell If Your Dog is Giving You Soft Eyes.



In this photo, the pet parent is giving her dog human loving attention. When you and your dog are relaxed, bonding and connecting your can look loving and briefly like the pet parent in this photo.

It is obvious by the upward tilt of the dogs head and the raised nose and his “soft eyes” that he dog has learned that his pet parents eye contact and head hold mean, "Mommy loves me. " I hope that he got this loving interaction after he has did something good, like brought her a toy, made his bed washed the dishes!

Pay attention to your dog when he is good. Your dog loves to get your attention. Just like a human child, your dog will do things to be noticed. Here is what is important. He will do something and then watch your body language to see how you respond.
If you notice him and make eye contact when he is doing something bad, chewing a slipper, getting on the sofa, then guess what he may do that very same thing. Your look, your attention is rewarding. Read the post on dog’s interpretation of eye contact to learn all the different interpretation your dog can have from your look.

“Soft eyes” The dogs eyes are partially closed sometimes squinty. You really have t look the whole dog to see if a dog has “soft eyes” Look at the dog’s posture, facial expression and eye position to make sure the dog is relaxed and non-threatening. Softness can be read in a slight squint, the rest of the facial features relaxed, the lips long and the commeasure back and the ears neutral (neutral is different for different dogs but one tell for softness is that the ears are not back pressed against the head or spread out and tense like antenna.



Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional
The Body Language Expert
Web- http://www.PattiWood.net
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Should You Hug Your Dog? Reading Dog and Human Body Language. Do Dogs Like it When You Hug Them?



Dog and Human Body Language. Do Dogs Like it When You Hug Them?

If you can view this sideways photo, you will find me on the floor with m dog Bo. It was taken of us several years ago when Bo was one of two. This photo really shows how much I love my dog. I love him so much I have my one arm wrapped around his neck and may I am holding his hindquarters with my other hand and arm. I also have my head tilted towards him in love and my heart is pressed up against him. Bo is cradling up against me. However, I notice his tail is down. He is big frightened of the photographer and the flashes from the camera. His body is toward me and his head is relaxed into me so it is clear he is seeking comfort from me and is not trying to get away. However, reading my dog's body language, I bet the combination of a too human like hug that to a dog feels too confining and the big ole camera and crowd in my kitchen is not helping. Dogs don't typically like to be hugged. I know, if you have a wonderful dog like my dog Bo you really want to hug on him. Don’t take it personally, if your dog tries to escape your loving embrace. Most dogs don’t like the restriction as it keeps them from “fleeing” mode that is a dogs normal response to stress. Think about it in human terms. You wouldn’t like it if someone came a held your feet when you were stressed, would you? I am a big hugger and I am so blessed that over the years Bo has not only adapted to my hugs but seeks them. Most dogs don’t mind a pat or a very brief full hug but you need to know your dog and watch them closely to understand if they are hug tolerant. Dogs can fear or love hugs.

I enjoy watching TV shows that play videos of kids and babies and dogs. It is cute when dogs allow babies and kids to hug them. However, there is that part of me that wants to teach everyone you don't hug dogs you don’t know. Hugs are not the accepted greeting ritual. Instead, approach strange dogs by putting out your hand so they can sniff it. If the dog feels safe and friendly he will let you know by staying in place to say, “Your OK!” but not freezing in place in fear which says in dog body language, “I am too scared to move.” In another show of the acceptance may be presenting the side of his body to say, “I won’t be aggressive by coming at you head on I will give you my side so you can pet me now.”



As the national spokesperson for Pup-Peroni, I am studying the similarities and differences between human body language and dog behavior.






Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional
The Body Language Expert
Web- http://www.PattiWood.net
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Martin Sheen, How Men Carry Babies



Look at the way Martin Sheen carries his baby. I think it is so fun how often men carry babies like a sack of groceries. I have been reading photos of celebrities with their dogs for the campaign I am doing for Pup-peroni. I have a few photos where the guys carry their dogs in the same way, just like a bag or groceries. Here Martin does have his child a bit more on his hip, that is one of the ways women carry children, which makes good use of women's larger hips.

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional
The Body Language Expert
Web- http://www.PattiWood.net
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How Dogs Comfort Us. A Story of dog body language

Years ago I broke my wrist and my dog Bo was so wonderfully comforting.
I was walking around for six weeks with my wrist in cast and and my arm in a sling. Bo was really worried about me. I knew he was reading my body language and he could tell I was in pain. Each and every time I would sit down on the couch Bo would come up and lie down across my feet saying nonverbally, "I don't want you to hurt youself again" and "Rest Mommy you are moving to much and working to hard." It was so comforting. In those first few weeks when I was in such pain it meant so much. He also did another body langauge gesture that he had never done before. When I was in pain streached out on the couch or in bed Bo would take his body and lay across my legs so there was no way I could get up without asking his to move and he would look at me and check on me occasionally to make sure I was ok. It was so sweet.


As the national spokesperson for Pup-peroni, I have lots of blog posts with insights into human body language and the cues your dog gives you in dog and human interactions. Check the posts about what your dog is saying with his body language and what he reads in yours under "dog and human body language."
Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional
The Body Language Expert
Web- http://www.PattiWood.net
I have a new quiz on my YouTubestation. Check it out!
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Muzzel Nudge, Dog Body Language.

Muzzle Nudge. A dog gives a muzzle nudge by taking his nose and nudging the face of their pet owner. They do this in greeting and or to show friendliness, I prefer to friendly rather than submissive. Think of the dog using his nose the way a human child may come up and use his hand to touch his mom to say. "Hi there, could I have your attention."

Alternatively, dogs use the muzzle nudge to say, “I’m hungry” Bo the wonder dog does a muzzle nudge to be fed and muzzle nudges my hand to ask me to pet him. If I stop, petting and Bo want more he lets me know. Bo nudges me again, sometimes going a step further and actually placing his nose under my palm and tossing the palm up towards his head or back to let me know where he thinks my hand should be.
Imagine a dog with a great soft-eyed loving look coming up right now and giving your a muzzle nudge.
Look for another one of my blog posts for the origin of the muzzle nudge.


Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional
The Body Language Expert
Web- http://www.PattiWood.net
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The "play bow" is dog body language for "Wanna Play?"

Play Bow. Dogs love to play and they have a wonderful way of asking others if they would like to play called a "play bow." How do Animal Behaviorists describe a "play bow?” When a dog once to play with another dog or a human he approached then bows down to the other dog or human with the front half of his body. (Dogs typically approach new dogs at their sides rather than head on so, if they bow head on to another dog or to a human the bow makes the approach nonaggressive.)
In a play bow, a dog stretches out the front of his body and his front leg go out and forward and flat to the ground, typically up to the dogs “elbows” Lowering the front of his body shows is a submissive gesture. Most dogs leave their hindquarters, (rear ends) up and give a relaxed mouth smile as they “play bow.” They may even wag their tales. All these behaviors combine into to “I am up for fun.” “Let’s play” Sometimes it is a request to “Play war” or “Play wrestle.” Remember the lowered body says it is play not real battle. The dog says “I won’t really hurt you. “I up for fun and I am not going to attack.” In a "play bow”, the dog stretches the front of his body out and down and places his paws our flat and relaxed. Sometimes a dog will actually come up to a dog or human and bow and pat his paws on the ground in an exuberant movement and then step back or look towards the spot in which they want to play or the toy they want you to play with them. Human pet parents can respond their dogs play blow and bound with their dogs by getting down on the ground and imitating the play bow with the front of your body down and patting your hands on the floor a few times. You can even associate with a word like "Play" as you pat so your dog can learn the word play. I both initiate play with my dog Bo by patting my easily flat on the floor or patting them down in front of me on the coffee table. If my dog Bo the wonder dog initiates play with me with a play bow, I say the word "play" and we begin to play.
Watch dogs in a dog park go up to other dogs and give them the play bow and their new friends respond with a play bow and then watch them run off together it is wonderful.

As the national spokesperson for Pup-Peroni, I am studying the similarities and differences between human body language and dog body language (or what animal behaviorist call dog behavior.)




Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional
The Body Language Expert
Web- http://www.PattiWood.net
I have a new quiz on my YouTubestation. Check it out!
YouTube- YouTube - bodylanguageexpert's Channel

The Play Bow

Play Bow. Dogs love to play and they have a wonderful way of asking others if they would like to play called a "play bow." How do Animal Behaviorists describe a "play bow??” When a dog once to play with another dog or a human he approached then bows down to the other dog or human with the front half of his body. (Dogs typically approach new dogs at their sides rather than head on so, if they bow head on to another dog or to a human the bow makes the approach nonaggressive.)
In a play bow, a dog stretches out the front of his body and his front leg go out and forward and flat to the ground, typically up to the dogs “elbows” Lowering the front of his body shows is a submissive gesture. Most dogs leave their hindquarters, (rear ends) up and give a relaxed mouth smile as they “play bow.” They may even wag their tales. All these behaviors combine into to “I am up for fun.” “Let’s play” Sometimes it is a request to “Play war” or “Play wrestle.” Remember the lowered body says it is play not real battle. The dog says “I won’t really hurt you. “I up for fun and I am not going to attack.” In a "play bow”, the dog stretches the front of his body out and down and places his paws our flat and relaxed. Sometimes a dog will actually come up to a dog or human and bow and pat his paws on the ground in an exuberant movement and then step back or look towards the spot in which they want to play or the toy they want you to play with them. Human pet parents can respond their dogs play blow and bound with their dogs by getting down on the ground and imitating the play bow with the front of your body down and patting your hands on the floor a few times. You can even associate with a word like "Play" as you pat so your dog can learn the word play. I both initiate play with my dog Bo by patting my easily flat on the floor or patting them down in front of me on the coffee table. If my dog Bo the wonder dog initiates play with me with a play bow, I say the word "play" and we begin to play.
Watch dogs in a dog park go up to other dogs and give them the play bow and their new friends respond with a play bow and then watch them run off together it is wonderful.

As the national spokesperson for Pup-Peroni, I am studying the similarities and differences between human body language and dog behavior.


One of the wasy you can learn to read your dogs mood is by noticing how he looks when he is happy and playing. Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional
The Body Language Expert
Web- http://www.PattiWood.net
I have a new quiz on my YouTubestation. Check it out!
YouTube- YouTube - bodylanguageexpert's Channel

TheBachelor.com is following Patti on Twitter.

Funny,

I just noticed that the Bachelor.com website is following me on twitter. Welcome. I would love to hear your questions. You can email me at Patti@Pattiwood.net
Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional
The Body Language Expert
Web- http://www.PattiWood.net
I have a new quiz on my YouTubestation. Check it out!
YouTube- YouTube - bodylanguageexpert's Channel