Your Facial Expressions Show You are Sleepy, Does Sleep Deprivation Effect Your Relationships? Do People Treat You Differently if you are Sleepy

http://www.sciencedaily.com/news/top/environment/
Study reveals the face of sleep deprivation

Here is the most interesting part of the research on the facial expression of sleep deprived tired people. They look sadder.  Yes, on some level you know that. But for me it is extremely interesting. Think about it. How do you interact with someone who is sad? Are you more empathetic? Are you gentler or do you avoid people at work who look sad? What about leadership, credibly, sales and persuasion? Do you take the advice of someone who looks tired? Do you buy from a tired sales guy? Do you follow the protocol for your health from your sleep deprived Doctor? Do kids ignore the commands of their tired parents?
I would love to do a study on this. Here is the study I read on the facial expression of the sleep deprived.

Results show that the faces of sleep-deprived individuals were perceived as having more hanging eyelids, redder eyes, more swollen eyes and darker circles under the eyes. Sleep deprivation also was associated with paler skin, more wrinkles or fine lines, and more droopy corners of the mouth. People also looked sadder when sleep-deprived than after normal sleep, and sadness was related to looking fatigued.


Date - August 30, 2013

Source - American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Summary
A new study finds that sleep deprivation affects facial features such as the eyes, mouth and skin, and these features function as cues of sleep loss to other people.
Tired eyes.
Credit: © Sylvie Bouchard / Fotolia
http://images.sciencedaily.com/2013/08/130830161323-large.jpg
Tired eyes.
Credit: © Sylvie Bouchard / Fotolia
A new study finds that sleep deprivation affects facial features such as the eyes, mouth and skin, and these features function as cues of sleep loss to other people.
Results show that the faces of sleep-deprived individuals were perceived as having more hanging eyelids, redder eyes, more swollen eyes and darker circles under the eyes. Sleep deprivation also was associated with paler skin, more wrinkles or fine lines, and more droopy corners of the mouth. People also looked sadder when sleep-deprived than after normal sleep, and sadness was related to looking fatigued.
"Since faces contain a lot of information on which humans base their interactions with each other, how fatigued a person appears may affect how others behave toward them," said Tina Sundelin, MSc, lead author and doctoral student in the department of psychology at Stockholm University in Stockholm, Sweden. "This is relevant not only for private social interactions, but also official ones such as with health care professionals and in public safety."
The study, which appears in the September issue of the journal Sleep, was conducted at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. Ten subjects were photographed on two separate occasions: after eight hours of normal sleep and after 31 hours of sleep deprivation. The photographs were taken in the laboratory at 2:30 p.m. on both occasions. Forty participants rated the 20 facial photographs with respect to 10 facial cues, fatigue and sadness.
According to the authors, face perception involves a specialized neuronal network and is one of the most developed visual perceptual skills in humans. Facial appearance can affect judgments of attributes such as trustworthiness, aggressiveness and competence.


Story Source:
The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:
1.     Tina Sundelin, Mats Lekander, Göran Kecklund, Eus J. W. Van Someren, Andreas Olsson, John Axelsson. Cues of Fatigue: Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Facial Appearance. SLEEP, 2013; DOI: 10.5665/sleep.2964


Cite This Page:
*       MLA
*       APA
*       Chicago

American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "Study reveals the face of sleep deprivation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 August 2013. .



Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at www.PattiWood.net. Check out Patti's website for her new book "SNAP, Making the Most of First Impressions, Body Language and Charisma" at www.snapfirstimpressions.com. Also check out Patti's YouTube channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

People With MS Can Have Trouble Reading Emotion From Body Language Posture Cues and It Can Make Them Seem Cold and Unfeeling


I have a friend Cathy whose sister Beth has MS.  Cathy struggles with her relationship her sister. No matter what Cathy does to help Beth, her sister seems selfish and lacks empathy. It is all about Beth and her needs. A new research study on MS and the lack of the ability to read nonverbal cues of emotion may explain all or at least some of her problems with her sister. People with MS may not read body language posture cues of emotions well.
I can see if you can’t read you would have trouble mirroring and empathizing.  Here is the link to the article. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141110083515.htm and below is the actual article.

Recognizing emotions, and what happens when this is interrupted

November 10, 2014
:
Sissa Medialab
Recognizing the emotions other people feel is crucial for establishing proper interpersonal relations. To do so, we look at (amongst other things) facial expressions and body posture. Unfortunately, in some neurological disorders this ability is heavily impaired. This happens, for example, in multiple sclerosis where scientific evidence shows that people affected by the disease often have trouble recognizing expressions that communicate emotions. A new study now demonstrates that the same difficulty may also be encountered with emotions conveyed by posture.
Share This

Recognizing the emotions other people feel is crucial for establishing proper interpersonal relations. To do so, we look at (amongst other things) facial expressions and body posture. Unfortunately, in some neurological disorders this ability is heavily impaired. This happens, for example, in multiple sclerosis where scientific evidence shows that people affected by the disease often have trouble recognizing expressions that communicate emotions.
A new study now demonstrates that the same difficulty may also be encountered with emotions conveyed by posture. In addition, the study shows that this difficulty recognizing other people's emotions is unrelated to difficulties identifying one own's emotions, a disorder known as alexithymia, which may be present in patients with multiple sclerosis.
"The finding on posture is new, and even though this symptom is less pronounced than the inability to read facial expressions, it is nonetheless important" explains Marilena Aiello, a SISSA researcher. "Studies on the identification of expressions in neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis are important. In this type of disease the relationship between patients and carers is crucial to guarantee the patient the best quality of life. It's thus vital to identify the factors that may influence and improve this relationship."
In addition to Aiello, the other SISSA researchers who participated in the study, published in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, are Cinzia Cecchetto (first author) and Raffaella Rumiati, a SISSA neuroscientist who coordinated the research project.

Story Source:
The above story is based on materials provided by Sissa Medialab. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

Journal Reference:

1.     Cinzia Cecchetto, Marilena Aiello, Delia D’Amico, Daniela Cutuli, Daniela Cargnelutti, Roberto Eleopra, Raffaella Ida Rumiati. Facial and Bodily Emotion Recognition in Multiple Sclerosis: The Role of Alexithymia and Other Characteristics of the Disease. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 2014; 1 DOI: 10.1017/S1355617714000939

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at www.PattiWood.net. Check out Patti's website for her new book "SNAP, Making the Most of First Impressions, Body Language and Charisma" at www.snapfirstimpressions.com. Also check out Patti's YouTube channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Body Language Read of Blake and Ryan - Easy Does It!




Ryan Reynolds, 38, and Blake Lively, 27, sexed it up for the cameras at the Met Gala in May.  As he palms his wife's rear, "Ryan has that proud look on his face, like, "Look at this babe I've got an my arm!".  There is a boyishness there, says Patti.  But Ryan's red-carpet approach was entirely different with a now-pregnant Blake at the Angel Ball in NYC.  "Ryan's fingers are tenderly curled around her back.  It is as though he doesn't want to hurt her as he draws her in!"

Patti gives the couple in May a 3 on the Life and Style True Love Rating Scale.

Patti gives the couple in October a 5 on the Life and Style True Love Rating Scale.

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at www.PattiWood.net. Check out Patti's website for her new book "SNAP, Making the Most of First Impressions, Body Language and Charisma" at www.snapfirstimpressions.com. Also check out Patti's YouTube channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Body Language Read of Kim and Kanye - Ships in the Night!



Kim Kardashian, 34, stole the spotlight from Kanye West, 37, during a September appearance in London.  "She looks as though she could be there all by herself,"  observes Patti.  "It's odd that Kanye's almost hidden behind her."  Things improved at a recent gala - sort of.  "They're looking at each other and having fun, but there is still no tenderness and connection here.  It look so fake!"

Patti gives this couple in September a 1 on the Life & Style True Love Rating Scale.

Patti gives this couple in November a 3 on the Life & Style True Love Rating Scale.

Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at www.PattiWood.net. Check out Patti's website for her new book "SNAP, Making the Most of First Impressions, Body Language and Charisma" at www.snapfirstimpressions.com. Also check out Patti's YouTube channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.

Nine Tips For Self Promotion for Women How to Brag Successfuly So You Don't Look Like a Show Off.


                                                         Nine Tips for Self Promotion For Women
                                   How to Brag Successfully so You Don't Look Like a Show Off

How to successfully and gracefully self promote? For years I taught a two day Women and Leadership course at the Wharton School of Business. Each time this extremely impressive group of women struggled with the same issues. They were not being promoted and getting the raises they deserved. They kept their heads down and worked hard but they didn't get the appropriate recognition.  Here are the top ten methods to brag in a politically correct manner.

1.   Be fearless and speak well of what you have done. Yes, there is a gender based difference in how men who self-promote are perceived and how women who say the same kind of things about themselves are perceived. But, that perception can ONLY change if women are courageous and speak well of their accomplishments.  A good rule of thumb is make sure your not talking about yourself to seek attention, and by sharing things that you would find admirable in others and might compliment them on.

2. Choose to do things that are worthy of self promotion. Be courageous, take risks. I don't mean take on more tasks and be a workaholic, I mean be thoughtful in your choices. Spend your time wisely and with integrity. Volunteer for important projects. Help other team members. Work on committees, (You can choose to be on committees with important people.) Speak up at meetings with great ideas. Volunteer to give speeches and volunteer to introduce other speakers. Take the lead position on projects, suggest and spearhead innovations.

3.     Learn to tell a short self-promotional story.  “Last week the most fantastic thing happened... “I had the best week this week……”, “I feel so great about something that happened this week..” and then tell about one specific success. Don’t preface it with how tired you are. Don’t list all you did, or how busy your week was. Tell one very brief story. A heroes journey is interesting.  A recap of your to do list or rundown of all the things on your outlook calendar is boring. If you have not read, "The Power of Myth" find it or at least read about it so you know what a hero's journey looks and sounds like. Make sure you include a brag bites―pieces of relevant facts, such as clients that you’re working with, how long you’ve been in the industry, or a project you’ve recently completed.  The best way to start a story conversation is by asking others about what great things have happened to them since you saw them last. Listen earnestly to their stories then take a turn. Another way to self promote with a story is volunteer to give speeches. Then an entire group can hear your story.
4    Be very careful of your tone and nonverbal delivery.  Look at how men get excited and make the telling of their heroes journey into a fun journey for the listener.  Don’t be haughty, don’t hog too much time. Think how men share a sports success,  “I hit a home run, I caught the ball, I made a hole in one" story and watch when people actually ENJOY listening because they feel the pleasure and excitement the adventure and challenge along with the story teller. But remember, women have a narrower band of acceptable delivery options so you can't be over the top and again you must tell a shorter story than a man.
5.      Send a thoughtful email to a specific person about your accomplishment. Men will email what they have done to accomplish their projects and you can do. If you see a good example of someone stating and accomplishment in an email you receive model it. Don't send a group email listing your checked off to dos. Write about one accomplishment. If you are not sure how it sounds read it out loud or try it out on someone who can be brutally honest with you about how it sounds.
6       Make you work visible by spending time with people. Talk to people who can recommend you. Take influential people out for coffee or lunch, stop by people’s offices and ask what they are up to. Spend productive time sharing and visiting in the break room. Tell people what you are working and how great you feel about the work. Women tend to spend time talking about hot hard they work and how tired and overwhelmed they are. Don't do that. Instead, talk about how much fun you are having and how exciting the task is and how much you are discovering. Remember to share your hero's journey not your victim plight.
7.      Compliment and "brag on" other women. When you focus on others accomplishments and notice what is worthy of praise your energy is focused in the right place and your learn what matters. One simple way to give praise is with an introduction. For example, when you introduce your female friends and coworkers and business friends to someone new share their name and an accomplishment. "Jim, this is Sara Beckman, she just headed up the committee for our new quarter sales meeting and it was fantastic." "Tom, this is Morgan Tyler, she just spearheaded the new marketing project." "Karl, this is Veronica Mann, she works with our top client Prudential." Another way to champion other women is to send women notes when they have a success. If they write a good report, give thoughtful insights at meeting, get promoted send a note!

8. Ask other woman to brag for you. If you have established healthy reciprocal working relationships with other women it is perfectly acceptable to ask them to help you by giving a brag boost. You can even ask someone to share something specific with someone specific. But if you do this I advise that you always reciprocate. Be the person shares positive things about others.

9. Post accomplishments on social media. You can self promote and promote others on social media. The easiest way to is to post photos. Post photos of your team, your clients and customers. When others you work with do important work take a photos.  If you serve on a committee and you have a success take a photo of the whole committee and post it. If someone you know just finished a great presentation ask to take a photo of her and post it. If you give a great presentation have someone, perhaps the person who introduced you take a photo. If you volunteer and say, build a House for Habitat, take a photo of the whole process and post it.

10. Be a good listener. We like people who listen to us and often imbue them with good behaviors. I have shared this several times in this article because it is so important. If you want people to listen to you share your successes be the best listener for them. It will not only make you more discriminating about what and how you self promote but more importantly it is just gracious behavior.

You are a super women on a fantastic adventure, fly on.
 
For ways to look good at work you may wish to the following articles.

Five Ways to Give a Great First Impression
http://www.pattiwood.net/article.asp?PageID=11491
Nonverbal Cues of  A Good Listener
http://www.pattiwood.net/article.asp?PageID=2323
How Do We Know Someone is Credible Within Seconds of Meeting Them?
http://www.pattiwood.net/article.asp?PageID=10452

On a personal note.
When I was in my late thirties I was at a party with my fiancé  and someone asked me what I did for a living. I said, "I am a body language expert and professional speaker."
Later my fiancé chastised me for saying I was a body language expert. I remember going through a cascade of different emotions in that moment.
First  I felt shame at the thought that I could have been inappropriate and a braggart. But then I realized that was not what I should feel I should feel proud of being and expert. Then a stronger emotion took over and I was angry at my fiancé for not seeing me for all I was. Then I felt disappointment in myself as I realized, that he might not even know all that I had accomplished. I didn't even brag to him? I felt sad for all years of modesty, years where I actually kept my accomplishments a secret like I was some kind of super hero who had to keep their glasses and nerd outfit on. Then it was if I was suddenly imbued with Super Powers. I felt bold and
I said,  " I have two degrees in nonverbal communication, I taught body language at two universities. My body language class at Florida state averaged 150 students each semester and was voted one of the most popular college courses in the county,  I have been researching and consulting on the topic for many years. I have written a book on body language. And I have been speaking on the topic to the top companies around the world for many years. I am an expert!
It was boastful and gave far too much of a laundry list, but by god I bragged and if felt good.


Patti Wood, MA, Certified Speaking Professional - The Body Language Expert. For more body language insights go to her website at www.PattiWood.net. Check out Patti's website for her new book "SNAP, Making the Most of First Impressions, Body Language and Charisma" at www.snapfirstimpressions.com. Also check out Patti's YouTube channel at http://youtube.com/user/bodylanguageexpert.